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How Much Does Artificial Insemination Cost?

  • 5 min read

How Much Does Artificial Insemination Cost?

Article medically reviewed by Dr. Gary Levy, Reproductive Endocrinologist specializing in the treatment of fertility and complex reproductive disorders with Fertility Cloud.

Whether you’re having trouble getting pregnant, a same sex couple, or single parent by choice needing a little help – you’ve probably started doing some research and found that artificial insemination is something you might try as you look to grow your family. And you’re probably wondering, how much does artificial insemination cost? 

To make sure we’re all on the same page here, let’s first explain exactly what artificial insemination is. Artificial insemination is when sperm is introduced to the uterus, or cervix, without having sexual intercourse.

What types of artificial insemination are out there?

The two primary artificial insemination procedures are: Intracervical Insemination (ICI) and Intrauterine Insemination (IUI). 

Intracervical Insemination (ICI) is the process of delivering sperm (the ejaculate) directly into a female reproductive tract, into, at or near the cervical opening – basically to the door to the uterus. An ICI is done either at home or at a doctor’s office. For a home ICI, using a specially designed syringe, like Mosie, improves the chances of pregnancy.

When conducted in a doctor's office, your doctor might use a catheter (thin, flexible tube) with a syringe attached to the end of it, to deposit the sperm to the cervix. To be the most effective, it’s important to time the insemination precisely during your fertile window, typically in the twenty-four hours prior to ovulation.

Intrauterine Insemination (IUI) is the process of placing sperm directly inside your uterus. This medical procedure should only be done at a doctor’s office or by a medical professional, and is often done in combination with ovulation inducing or ovarian-stimulating drugs. A doctor, typically monitors the patient’s menstrual cycle, follicular growth, and luteinizing hormone levels with blood tests, ovulation tests and vaginal ultrasounds. Then, the IUI procedure is timed within 24 to 36 hours before ovulation. 

When it’s time to perform the insemination, the partner or donor sperm sample is “washed”. This process separates the sperm from the semen, removes any non-moving or low-motility sperm, and eliminates any disease-carrying material or toxins. 

In order to get the sperm inside the uterus, the doctor attaches a vial, filled with the washed sperm, to the end of a long, thin, and flexible tube called an IUI catheter. The catheter is then inserted into the vagina, then through the cervical opening and into the uterus – where the vial filled with sperm is released.

Who usually uses artificial insemination?

Some of the best candidates for artificial insemination are:

  • People dealing with unexplained infertility
  • People with cervical mucus issues
  • Those who suffer from low sperm motility or have a low sperm count
  • Those who struggle with erectile dysfunction, impotence and/or premature ejaculation
  • Single Mothers By Choice
  • LGBTQ+ couples
  • People who are allergic to semen or find sexual intercourse painful

Who is not a good candidate for IUI or ICI? Artificial insemination is only an option for people with a healthy uterus, at least one patent (unobstructed) Fallopian tube, and are able to identify ovulation either at home or through medical monitoring.

So, how much does artificial insemination really cost?

The price tag for artificial insemination depends on which procedure you choose, and whether or not your health insurance covers any fertility treatments. It can even depend on which doctor you visit, as rates often vary by clinic. 

How much does IVF cost, and is it covered by insurance?  

If you’re paying for an in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure, without the help of insurance, it can cost between $10,000 and $50,000. The medications required with the IVF process cost an additional $1,500 to $4,000 per cycle. Some fertility clinics offer package deals that include more than one attempt in their pricing. There are also additional fees for things like preimplantation genetic testing (PGT) – which is a procedure used to help identify genetic defects within embryos. So, the average IVF patient can expect to spend $30,000 to $60,000 - all in on their journey. Definitely call your insurance provider and get an estimate from your doctor before proceeding down this route so you can plan your finances accordingly.

How much does IUI cost and is it covered by insurance? 

If you’re paying out of pocket for an IUI procedure, it typically costs between $400 and $2,000 per attempt. Costs can vary depending on if you are using frozen sperm and again, which doctor or clinic you choose, if your insurance covers the procedure and/or any of the appointments leading up to the IUI. You will want to check with your insurance company before proceeding with an IUI.  

How much does ICI cost and is it covered by insurance?

The only cost of doing ICI at home, is for the insemination kit itself.  One of the most popular options for home insemination is the Mosie Kit, which comes with two clinically proven, patent-pending insemination syringes, a specimen collection cup, and detailed instructions on how to use MosieA Mosie Kit costs $89 ($44.50 per attempt) and is currently available at www.mosiebaby.com. You will want to check with your insurance to see if it is covered by your FSA. 

If you do ICI at the doctor’s office, check in prior to the procedure to see what fees they charge per attempt – and if your insurance will cover it, and any other visits leading up to it.

How does Mosie compare in price and efficacy to other forms of artificial insemination?

We get asked all the time how Mosie, which is a method of intracervical insemination (ICI), is different than Intrauterine Insemination (IUI) - and it’s a great question! Both Mosie and IUI are intended to help people facing many of the same fertility obstacles and The Mosie Kit is clinically proven to be as effective as IUI. Mosie (ICI) is also conducted on a similar timeline to IUI, during the fertile window, typically in the 24-48 hours prior to ovulation.

There are several differences between an IUI and Mosie (or ICI). With an IUI, a doctor places sperm directly into a person’s uterus. With Mosie’s at-home insemination kit, sperm is delivered at or near the cervical opening.

With IVF the insemination part happens in a laboratory, typically,  in combination with the use of injectable hormones. We have reports of couples who were successful with Mosie, after several failed IVF and IUI attempts.  

For many people, trying Mosie first is a great option. That way they know that they’ve tried everything they could on their own, before moving on to medical procedures that could cost thousands with no guarantee of success. It often also helps eliminate the stress of “trying” month after month. If you’re unsure of whether or not Mosie is right for you, be sure to chat with your doctor


Whichever path to parenthood you take, we’re here to offer support and easy to understand information that will hopefully help you on your unique journey! Feel free to reach out if we can help support you. Whether you end up trying Mosie, or decide to go another route, we wish you success! 

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